Syphilis: Then and Now (Or What I’ve Been Doing For the Last 10 Years)

syphilisAn article about our work called Syphilis: Then and Now appeared in this month’s edition of The Scientist.

In it, Molly Zuckerman (U. Mississippi), George Armelagos (Emory U.), and I describe the work we’ve done together on the origins of syphilis. This was a great opportunity to look back at the last ten years, weaving together many different strands of research to figure out what exactly we have learned.

We talk about all the different approaches we’ve employed to try and learn more about the past of T. pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, as well as the lesser-known non-sexually transmitted diseases, yaws and bejel. Looking at old bones in dusty basements? Building a phylogeny with T. pallidum samples collected from all over the world, including remote Amazonian villages? Getting to the bottom of a gruesome disease that causes wild baboons’ genitals to drop off? We’ve done it all! (With a lot of help from other people, of course.)

I will always feel incredibly lucky that I got to carry out my dream dissertation project. Every research project has its highs and lows, but throughout my PhD research I marveled that somebody was paying me to do what I would have gladly done for free. I will also be forever grateful that I had the privilege to work with so many amazing scientists. Thinking back on all this work was a really pleasant endeavor.

Writing this article also forced us to think about the future of this line of research. As we make clear in the article, although our work has shed some new light on the centuries-old debate about syphilis’s origins, there are plenty of questions left. As our ability to obtain whole genome sequences from even poor-quality samples improves, I’m really looking forward to seeing what we learn. The history of this bacterium is just as fascinating to me now as it was when I began my work.

Anyway, writing this article was a lot of fun–and if you are interested in the history of infectious diseases, I hope you will check it out!

And thanks to the folks at The Scientist, especially Jef Akst, for the chance to share our work. It was a pleasure to work with them on this.

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